Stay in your lane

Usually, I avoid discussing controversial topics in this blog. Indeed, I like to think of this as a safe place where my readers can retreat for a laugh or two. Usually at my expense.

mcdonald'sBut with a controversy of epic proportions threatening to divide the country, I can no longer remain silent. I’m speaking, obviously, of McDonald’s double drive-thru.

When the first double drive-thru came to town, I went on record proclaiming my appreciation for it. My opinion has not changed. Vociferous double drive-thru critics, however, argue that it doesn’t speed up the fast food delivery process. They may be right, but I’m not addressing that issue. I’m concentrating on the question of which lane to choose.

For those of you unfamiliar with a double drive-thru, it’s exactly as it sounds. There are two lanes, each with its own intercom. After placing their orders, customers merge from the two lanes into one that takes them to the pay-here and pick-up-your-order windows. In spite of some confusion over who merges first into the single lane and the violence that has broken out at locations throughout the country, it’s actually a simple process.

Or so I thought. But I’ve recently learned that, for some people, the problem begins at the beginning. In fact, there are those among us who believe that all customers should stay in the lane closest to the restaurant until they’ve pretty much reached the intercoms. Only then, they maintain, should a car move into the second lane.

One of my friends accuses people who bypass the first lane and zip into the second lane as lane skippers. A friend of a friend takes photos of these alleged lane skippers. Another friend flips off alleged lane skippers.

I guess there’s a chance she’s flipped me off because I always choose the shortest lane. Actually, I don’t know why anybody would waste time lingering in the longer lane when another, I repeat, shorter lane beckons them.

What’s more, there’s literally a sign at the drive-thru that gives us permission to do so. That’s right. I take the “any lane, any time” declaration as an invitation to choose any lane I want, any time I want. If I was supposed to wait impatiently in the long line, the sign would advise me to “remain in this long line until you either starve to death or reach the intercoms.”

But it doesn’t say that. So, as long as the “any lane, any time” sign remains, I’ll keep following directions – and risk getting flipped off.

This post originally appeared in the Appalachian News-Express.