Slip sliding away — January 14, 2020

Slip sliding away

According to the saying, we’re never too old to learn. Last Tuesday morning’s quick-moving snow reinforced that notion to me.

Of course, my trip to work began innocently enough. Sure, the street in front of my house was covered with snow, but it was slushy-ish and I drove slowly. And, yeah, the hill leading out of my neighborhood was a tad treacherous, but I put the car in low gear and survived.

We – my sister and I – didn’t encounter any other trouble until we turned onto a road that literally has mountain in its name. When we made the turn onto said mountain, a burst of humongous snowflakes fell from the sky. But I maneuvered the curvy and suddenly snowy road. And after I descended the mountain, I figured the worst was literally behind us.

I guess I momentarily forgot that my sister works on a hill.

When we arrived at said hill, the burst of humongous snowflakes had not let up. And although I could see that a layer of white covered the hill, I didn’t think it would be that bad.

I was wrong.

We made it midway up the hill, but when I turned into the parking lot, the car decided it would go no farther. It would not go forward. It would not go backward. It would, however, slide sideways down the slick hill.

So, with my car, to use one of my family’s favorite words, sidegoggled on the hill, I assessed the situation and politely suggested that my sister vacate the vehicle. Acknowledging that I lacked the skill set to turn the car around, I put it in park. From my assessment, I decided the car could remain on the hill until the snow melted or someone reported me to the authorities. Then, I exited the car and started directing traffic.

Not that there was much traffic. Luckily for me, though, a Good Samaritan stopped and offered to move the car. I took him up on his offer and he got into the car. And then, to use one of my mom’s favorite expressions, he turned that car around faster than a cat can lick its behind. (Writer’s note: She uses a word other than behind.)

Anyway, I expressed my gratitude, hopped into the car, and eased it down the snowy hill. Later that day, my sister and I collaborated to contact two of the Good Samaritan’s relatives and I shared details of my near-death experience with anyone who so much as made eye contact with me.

According to a saying I just made up, you can learn something from dern-near every experience. I learned oodles Tuesday morning. Most notably, I learned that Good Samaritans still exist.

This post originally appeared in the Appalachian News-Express.

Categories: Uncategorized

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